Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum Fund

Hamilton treasure is HCF’s newest agency fund

Establishing a long-term endowment fund at Hamilton Community Foundation has given the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum “instant credibility” with contributors says the museum’s President and CEO, David Rohrer. IMG_8656a

“We needed to develop a legacy gifts program for the museum,” he says, “and we quickly realized that we weren’t best suited internally to manage those investments. The community foundation offers the expertise we need. We are very pleased to be affiliated with HCF in this way. It was the right step.”

David points out that placing its endowment with HCF – the organization made its initial investment in 2015 – also exposes the museum to a wider range of potential supporters. The museum has a goal of contributing 10 percent of undesignated gifts to the fund, he says, and having the endowment at arm’s length protects it from the pressures of day-to-day operations.

“We are community-based and proud to be in Hamilton,” says David, “and we are very grateful for HCF’s support of the museum’s High Flight program, in addition to the endowment fund.” The High Flight initiative offers field trips and approved curriculum to Grade 6 science and Grade 10 history students. Twenty-five schools in the region participated this year. David illustrates the influence of the program: one of Canada’s current CF-18 fighter pilots reports that he got his first taste of aviation with a visit to the museum decades ago.

“The Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum is the largest flying museum in Canada,” says Terry Cooke of HCF. “It has been a Hamilton treasure for 44 years. We are thrilled that such an outstanding organization trusts us to manage its long-term endowment.”

 

Excerpt from 2016 Annual Report


Marnie & Bill Brehm Family Fund

The Brehms have confidence in HCF’s decision-making

 

Bill and Marnie Brehm

Marnie and Bill Brehm

Marnie Brehm has been involved with Hamilton Community Foundation since the 1980s, as a Board member and a contributor. She knows it well and trusts it to understand community needs. She and her husband Bill contribute regularly to the Community Fund.

“The Community Fund gives the Foundation capacity to respond to the most urgent needs in the community,” she says. Recent examples include the Foundation’s poverty work and its ABACUS education initiative.

Marnie, an accountant, and Bill, a retired planning consultant, have volunteered their time and talents at the leadership level in many organizations over the decades and they have confidence that Hamilton Community Foundation assesses community needs effectively. That is one reason they support the Community Fund – what Bill says in other organizations might be called the “general fund.” They also like the flexibility the Community Fund gives the Foundation and the speed with which it responds to changing community needs.

Marnie and Bill both support the community in a variety of ways – through HCF and other organizations – and they feel giving to the Community Fund is an important component of their philanthropy.

“While we could choose to support a particular cause or issue – and we do that in other aspects of our giving – we think the Community Fund is crucial too,” Marnie says. “The Foundation is in a position to best determine the needs of the community and this gives them the capacity to respond.”

Bill agrees: “Marnie’s Board experience and our contacts with staff give us confidence in the Community Fund decision-making process.  The Foundation works hard to identify and address key needs to be filled in the community.”

 

Excerpt from 2016 Annual Report


Terry and Brenda Yates: Paving a path for young Hamiltonians

HCF_Artwork_Mazza_Copyright

The beads represent objects that relate to a student’s potential through education. Each abacus bead was sculpted on a computer and then 3D printed. Steve Mazza, Artist

Terry and Brenda Yates see the community foundation’s current emphasis on education as a “natural evolutionary step” from its focus on eliminating poverty and they’ve made a significant commitment to help launch ABACUS, HCF’s community-wide initiative.

“As a former teacher,” says Brenda, “I believe that education is one of the best ways to bring people out of poverty. If you can help keep children on an educational path, they will find their way – despite difficult challenges in their backgrounds.”

Terry points to the mentoring component of the ABACUS program as one of the critical factors. “If children see someone older succeeding because of education – an older brother or an uncle or someone else they know – it makes a huge difference. That’s what we’re trying to do.”

The Yates have been actively involved with Hamilton Community Foundation since the 1990s and they appreciate its role in the community. “It’s an incubator,” says Brenda, describing the Foundation’s process of researching issues, bringing stakeholders together, and crafting shared solutions that maximize every partner’s unique contribution. They were early champions of the ABACUS idea and look forward to seeing it adopted in different ways across the community. Their new fund at HCF – the Terry and Brenda Yates Fund – is targeted at ensuring that “all children and youth have access to educational opportunities.”

“HCF is playing a unique leadership role,” says Terry, about why HCF is the home of their new fund. “The quality and commitment of the personnel at the community foundation is respected in the city. It’s recognized as an organization that believes in the future.”

Both Brenda and Terry love Hamilton and marvel at how readily Hamiltonians participate in philanthropy – with time or resources, each according to what he or she can do. While they are two outstanding examples, whose impact is incalculable, Terry just says “if you have a chance to make a difference, you should take it.”

 

Excerpt from 2016 Annual Report

 


United Nations Culture of Peace Hamilton Fund

 

Culture of Peace Hamilton is a working group of the United Nations in Canada (Hamilton Branch). It is one of a worldwide cluster of groups and individuals that consider peace-building and non-violence to be important local and international steps to social transformation. Dedicating the Peace Pole at City Hall

For the past sixteen years Culture of Peace Hamilton has focused its efforts on six pathways of action, originally drafted by Nobel Peace Laureates, researched by UNESCO, and proclaimed by the United Nations under Manifesto 2000. They are an invitation to citizens – actions everyone can take to instill a culture of peace in their daily lives.

  • Respect all life
  • Reject violence
  • Share with others
  • Listen to understand
  • Preserve the planet
  • Rediscover solidarity

Globally, seventy-five million people have pledged to follow these pathways to help diverse communities function better through greater cooperation and conflict resolution.

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Culture of Peace Hamilton continues to follow the pathways by reinforcing environmental issues, spiritual values and by working with like-minded organizations. The group meets regularly and hosts peace luncheons twice a year.  Peace poles and a thousand narcissi bulbs have been donated to the Peace Garden at Hamilton City Hall.   These installations and the garden help reinforce ideas of peace in tangible ways.

Peace Garden in Bloom

Your support of the United Nations Culture of Peace Hamilton Fund will provide ongoing support for these important peace initiatives.

Donations can be made by mailing a cheque payable to Hamilton Community Foundation at 120 King Street West, Suite 700 Hamilton ON L8P 4V2

Note: Please indicate ‘Culture of Peace Fund’ on the memo line of your cheque.

To donate online, click the link then follow the instructions:

http://hamiltoncf.akaraisin.com/donate

  1. Select ‘General Donation’ then scroll to click ‘Continue’
  2. Select ‘One time’ or ‘Monthly’ and gift  ‘Amount’
  3. Scroll to ‘Fund allocation’
  4. Click  ‘Community Fund’
  5. Scroll down to click on ‘More funds(click to see additional funds)
  6. Scroll down to ‘United Nations Culture of Peace Hamilton Fund’

All eligible donations receive charitable tax receipts.

cultureofpeacehamilton.com


Rotary Forever Fund

Rotary Forever

The Rotary Club of Hamilton carries out a literacy program at north-end schools, where club members provide reading assistance to students throughout the school year.

The Rotary Club of Hamilton carries out a literacy program at north-end schools, where club members provide reading assistance to students throughout the school year.

Hamilton’s first and largest Rotary Club, with almost a century of putting the Rotary motto of “Service above Self” in practice, has created a way for the club’s good work to be supported in perpetuity.

Of the 12 local clubs, the Downtown Rotary Club has become the first to launch an endowment fund with Hamilton Community Foundation. There are two options for making a gift to the Rotary Forever Fund: as an immediate donation from a living donor, or as a bequest identified in a person’s will. All gifts are pooled and invested. The capital is left untouched and only the investment income is disbursed to support Rotary projects and initiatives, as decided by the club’s Board of Directors.

“With the creation of this fund at HCF, we’re giving people a unique opportunity to leave a legacy that supports the work of Rotary,” says Robert Beres, Club President for 2006­-2007.  “In our club alone we have members with decades of service to Rotary; we can now offer them a way to benefit the club’s projects forever.” In addition, the fund is “open”, meaning that Rotarians and non-Rotarians alike can contribute.

The Downtown Rotary Club still undertakes annual fundraising campaigns and events such as its Hallowe’en Haunted House, or Spring Uncorked, a food and wine tasting event. Monies raised from those and other initiatives help to fund literacy programs and other supports aimed at underprivileged youth.

“Our club has given out an average of $72,000 annually in charitable donations over the past five years, and our members provide hands-on service too, such as helping children at north-end schools learn to read and do math,” explains past president Keith McIntyre. “The endowment fund at HCF is a different vehicle for giving – it allows us to take the long view and build something permanent.”

Excerpt from 2006-2007 Annual Report

 

Donate Now


The Lawyers’ Legacy for Children

Lawyer's Legacy

Hamilton’s lawyers have come together as a community to launch a permanent endowment fund to benefit local children. Long known for their individual support of a myriad of causes with their resources and time, Hamilton’s lawyers have chosen to work collectively to build a fund that will have an impact in perpetuity.

“We want this fund to be here to help Hamilton’s children forever,” says Justice Ray Harris, who was the driving force behind efforts to create the fund. “An endowed fund at Hamilton Community Foundation is the perfect way to ensure that.”

The Lawyers’ Legacy for Children is intended to help Hamilton children develop in the spirit of community and generosity that has characterized the contributions of Hamilton’s lawyers. The first grant made was to support autistic children in Hamilton.

The Hamilton Lawyers’ Club agreed to collaborate with HCF to establish the fund and developed the process by which regular grants will be recommended in the future.

The fund’s founding contribution came from the proceeds of the 2006 stage production, ‘Inherit the Wind’, which Justice Harris co-directed with former Theatre Aquarius artistic director Max Reimer. Local lawyers and judges played all the roles, to the delight of Hamilton audiences.

This unique theatre genre – the Lawyers’ Show – originated in Hamilton in 1983 when the Lawyers’ Club produced ‘12 Angry Men’ (also directed by Justice Harris). It has since been widely emulated in support of many worthy causes in communities across Canada and the U.S.

Hamilton’s lawyers and judges have made substantial contributions to augment the fund and are planning another Lawyers’ Show and other fundraising initiatives to build the endowment.

“Thanks to the generosity of Hamilton’s lawyers, this fund will endure for centuries,” says Justice Harris. “It will have a lasting impact that reflects our legal community’s commitment to the community at large and will always be there to help the children.”

Excerpt from 2008-2009 Annual Report

 

A legacy that continues

Since 2008, 12 grants have been awarded from the Lawyers Legacy Fund supporting important initiatives throughout the community.  The fund continues to grow with the fund capital now surpassing $250,000 – truly a legacy that will have impact forever.

 

Donate Now


Women 4 Change

W4C_Logo_Contribute 2

 

For all of our latest updates click here to see our winter newsletter.

Check out the most recent research paper that W4C commissioned on challenges and opportunities faced by local girls and women in the STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) area, and watch Shahad Al-Saqqar present her findings in this short video.

If you are interested in learning more about these events or how to become a W4C contributor, please contact Sheree Meredith

What is Women 4 Change?

Women 4 Change was established in 2012 by a group of local women who came together with HCF in a mission to inspire and enable the women of Hamilton to become leaders in philanthropy, while improving the lives of women and girls in our community through collective giving.

The founders of Women 4 Change envisioned an initiative where contributors would work collaboratively to achieve transformational change. They established a field of interest fund at Hamilton Community Foundation, to which each person contributes annually, as the vehicle through which annual grants to local organizations will be made. Throughout the year a number of educational and social opportunities are provided to enable contributors to learn about philanthropy and the issues they care about. They have established guiding principles to ensure the Women 4 Change initiative grows and develops in a meaningful and informed way.

W4C-16-01_Infograph_V03_Nov3

How will we make a difference?

Women 4 Change’s dual focus on philanthropic leadership among Hamilton’s women, and improving the lives of women and girls in this community, is central to how grants are made and how the contributors are engaged throughout the year. By joining together in these efforts we can create greater impact and work toward our goal of making a difference.

Early research undertaken by Women 4 Change shows that there are women and girls in this community in desperate need of additional supports to thrive. From this research we have included some notable facts below:

  • 16% of people in families in Hamilton whose major income earner was a female lived in low income compared to only 5.1% of persons in households where the major income earner was a male
  • Older women are more than twice as likely to be living in poverty (22%) as older men (10%)
  • Women are underrepresented among Hamilton’s elected officials, at the highest levels of local public sector institutions as well as in the private sector.

Read the full research paper to learn more. The Social Planning and Research Council of Hamilton produced the 2010 Women in Poverty report, that may also be of interest along with this report from the Girls Action Foundation. Subsequent studies commissioned by W4C have focused on Women’s Philanthropy and STEM:  Challenges and Opportunities.

Building on this knowledge, early W4C grants have focused on programs that focus on middle school-aged girls, are built on research, have measurable outcomes and aim to:

  • Foster independence and self-confidence
  • Remove barriers to success
  • Promote positive relationships

Read more about the first grant or watch the Girls ONLY video

To date, 7 grants totaling just under $67,000 have been awarded. These have provided the following support:

  • Hamilton East Kiwanis Boys’ and Girls’ Club to support a mix of girls-only programs
  • Queen Victoria School, Girls Only Program andGirls Only Camp and McMaster Trip
  • Liberty for Youth, Bright Choices for Girls Program
  • Joseph Immigrant Women’s Centre, Back to School Moms
  • Fit Active Beautiful (FAB) Foundation, Expansion of Riverdale Site
  • Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board Foundation, Girls Only Program

In addition, Women 4 Change hosts a breakfast each fall to celebrate the power and potential of women’s philanthropy.  View this short video

How can I get involved?

Supporters of Women 4 Change are asked to make an annual donation of $1,500 ($500 for contributors 35 and under). Donations are split to provide:

  • $1,000 for granting in the current year
  • $350 to build an endowment fund
  • $150 to cover administration of the giving circle

Grants will be made to organizations whose goals match those of the Women 4 Change fund at Hamilton Community Foundation. There will be an annual program of education and other events that all contributors will be invited to attend. The first will be an educational event addressing topics related to improving the lives of women and girls in Hamilton. The second event will share the stories of the organizations and people who are benefiting from the grants. Additional opportunities for involvement may be presented to contributors from time to time as appropriate.

Here’s what some of our current contributors are saying about Women 4 Change:

“The opportunity to create multiple pathways for giving/engaging that inspire women across educational backgrounds, experiences, ages and cultures to share their gifts in ways that are creative, thoughtful and supported by research”

“I am excited to see young women thrive and improve their lives with the support and interest of other women (of any age)”

“To realize I have the ability to help others … to learn that there are many other women who are devoted to philanthropy.  Together we will make a difference”

 

To learn more please contact Sheree Meredith at Hamilton Community Foundation or call 905-523-5600.


The Martin Foundation Fund

Martin Foundation

The Martin Foundation Fund at HCF will continue the charitable legacy established by law partners and siblings Argue Martin (left) and Hubert Martin (right) in 1968.

“Hamilton Community Foundation is the perfect home for the Martin Foundation as we transition to a new phase,” says family member Rosalind Johnston. “The legacy of the Martin family, and the Martin & Martin law firm, continues in Hamilton with this step.”

Argue Martin and Hubert Martin (Rosalind’s uncle and father respectively) were partners of the venerable Hamilton law firm and established the Martin Foundation in 1968 to support charitable causes.  Rosalind was a director of the foundation for more than 30 years, along with Argue’s son-in-law, the late Peter Richardson, and Martin & Martin law partner (now retired) Mary Lou Dingle.

“My father and uncle often favoured organizations that were just starting out, “ Rosalind says “and we concentrated on this area because of our roots in Hamilton. They felt an obligation to give back to the community in many ways.” Over the years, the Martin Foundation has supported hundreds of local organizations in the social services and the arts.

Hamilton Community Foundation was a natural choice as the Martin Foundation considered succession planning. Argue Martin was a founder and first president of HCF and Hubert was also a strong supporter.

“Dad would have loved this arrangement,” Rosalind says of the move to HCF in 2012. “He was a very forward-thinking man.”

Rosalind now sits on the advisory committee for the fund at Hamilton Community Foundation and has input into the grantmaking decisions. But the administrative work is handled by HCF. “This is a perfect solution for the future,” she says. “We used to spend hours poring over requests. Now, Hamilton Community Foundation handles all the applications and paperwork, but we continue to have input into how the money is spent. I’m thrilled.”

Excerpt from 2012-2013 Annual Report

 


The Mount Hamilton United Church Legacy Fund

Over the past year a number of long-standing organizations, now in transition, have turned to HCF to create a legacy by establishing new fund.

The Mount Hamilton United Church Legacy Fund recognizes the church’s 100 years serving Hamilton until May of this year.  It will continue to give back to the city as part of HCF’s community fund.

Excerpt from Legacy newsletter, Fall 2012


The School Sisters of Notre Dame Legacy Fund

Over the past year a number of long-standing organizations, now in transition, have turned to HCF to create a legacy by establishing new funds.

The School Sisters of Notre Dame Legacy Fund at HCF will support the education and societal needs of underprivileged women and children, a tradition the Sisters established in 1833.

Excerpt from Legacy newsletter, Fall 2012