Search Results for sponsorship


Charitable sponsorship rules

Agency relationships

As a public foundation, the community foundation is restricted by the Income Tax Act to make grants or distributions only to registered charitable organizations.  CCRA has recently requested that the relationship between the charity (lead partner) and the non-charitable organization (the agent) be formalized and documented before a grant can be awarded.

An organization that is not a registered charity wishing to apply for funding from the community foundation may consider the following:

1) make formal application to CCRA to become a registered charity, or

2) establish a partnership or agency relationship with a registered charity (RC) who would act as a ‘sponsor’ for the organization and the proposed project.

(i) the relationship must be a formal arrangement set out in writing between the boards of directors of the RC and the org.

(ii) the terms of the agreement should include:

  • a full description of the project
  • providing responsibility to RC for insuring the project is completed by the org as described
  • that RC has responsibility for distribution of funds to the org as work progresses
  • that RC has responsibility/accountability to CF for performance of the org

(iii) the relationship must be an appropriate link, not simply one of convenience.

Guidelines for a registered charity acting as a principal or partner are attached on Schedule 1.

An example of a contract provided by CRA is attached as Schedule 2.

Better together guide is another helpful resource in understanding charitable sponsorships.

For further information on becoming a registered charity or on establishing an agency relationship, please contact:

Charities Directorate
Canada Customs & Revenue Agency
1-800-267-2384


ABACUS Phase II: Answers to frequently asked questions

ABACUS Phase II: Answers to frequently asked questions

Here are answers to a number of questions you may have. If you have a question about this fund or the application process, please read through these frequently asked questions first. Please review and, if your question is not here, contact us at grants@hamiltoncommunityfoundation.ca and we will get back to you as soon as possible.  We will continue to update this section with answers to questions of broad interest.

How much funding should I be requesting?

For programs serving students in their middle-school years and into high school, we will provide grants up to $65,000 per year; you may apply for up to two years of funding.  For programs serving Grades 4 and 5, organizations can apply for up to $25,000 for one year only.

When can my program start and end?

We envision that the majority of programming will begin during the academic school year (i.e. September to June); however, program activities can also occur in the summer (i.e. July and August).  If your program is exclusively in the summer months, your program may be a better fit with another Foundation Fund such as the Hamilton Spectator Summer Camp Fund.

Can anyone apply for an ABACUS grant?

Grants from Hamilton Community Foundation are limited to registered charities or non-profits with a charitable partner (fiscal sponsorship). Information on fiscal sponsorships is available on our website.

Can I apply for both granting calls?

Yes. You can apply to both granting calls for two separate programs. If you have one program that spans the targeted age range of both calls (i.e. your program serves students in Grades 4-8), you must submit one application in each call (i.e. one application for ABACUS Liftoff! and one application for ABACUS+). Please keep in mind that we anticipate a large number of requests.

How many times can I apply to each granting call?

You are able to submit multiple applications if you have more than one program that fits each fund’s purpose. Although, we anticipate a large number of requests and we will aim to fund a range of organizations.

Can I apply for multi-year funding?

Organizations may apply for up to two years of funding through the ABACUS+ program. If you wish to be considered for two years of funding, this needs to be included in your application. ABACUS Liftoff! programs are not eligible for multi-year funding at this time. We would like to better understand the effectiveness of programs before making long-term funding commitments.

Is funding for school year vs full year a consideration?

Some programs require prep in summer, and some do go into the summer. However, we don’t want to necessarily fund summer-only program without good explanation.

Are personnel costs maxed as a percentage of the program?

No

My program is currently funded by ABACUS. Do I need to re-apply?

Most programs currently funded by ABACUS will need to re-apply for funding. We want to understand how your program aligns with ABACUS’ refinements (e.g. a deeper focus on students who face barriers and supporting the transition into high school).

There are a few currently funded ABACUS programs that have demonstrated they align with the direction of ABACUS Phase II. These programs have already been notified that they will receive funding.

What is the deadline for my application to be considered?

May 2, 2022 at 5:00 p.m.. Applications will not be accepted after this deadline.

When will I receive a decision about my grant application?

We anticipate that decisions will be made and organizations will be notified by the end of June 2022.

If my grant application is successful, when can I expect to receive funds?

We anticipate that funds will be released to successful applicants in July 2022.

My program serves students attending a High Priority or Equal Opportunities School. Does my program fit the criteria of the fund?

ABACUS aims to deepen its focus on student populations who face persistent and pervasive barriers in the education system. For example, a student attending a priority school may face barriers to learning because there is a language barrier; a situation at home prevents them from attending class regularly; their family cannot afford school supplies; and/or their culture is not represented in what or how they are being taught.

It is important to consider this combination of factors when designing your program’s activities – in other words, take an intersectional approach to meeting student needs. For example, a reading program can take an intersectional approach by incorporating different learning styles of students, culturally relevant books, and multiple access points to the program that are tailored to each student (e.g., language, transportation, food, physical accessibility, etc.).

Since ABACUS supports education programs, do I need to have a relationship with my local school or a school board to receive funding?

Students benefit when systems can work together to support their success and wellness. We are looking for some evidence of partnership with schools and/or school boards. This can be informal (e.g. a description of how your program works with educators) or formal (e.g. memorandum of understanding, partnership agreement).

Is there an expectation that we will work with other community organizations?

One program alone is not likely to be able to offer the range of supports students need. Programs are encouraged to consider partnership opportunities that help increase youth’s access to additional supports.

Does my program still need to incorporate ABACUS’ four pillars?

The first phase of ABACUS was based on four pillars of successful early intervention programs: academic upskilling, mentoring, goal setting and incentives. While these pillars are still important, research shows there are other components of early intervention programs that fall outside of this four-pillar framework. For example, parent engagement, cultural awareness, basic needs, foundational literacy skills and extra-curricular activities.

ABACUS Phase II will no longer require organizations to base their program on this four-pillar framework. However, we will still be looking for your program to incorporate elements of successful early intervention programs. You can read more about the original four pillars and early intervention here.

Can I request funds to support the evaluation of my program?

Yes, if required, you may request up to 15% of your total budget for evaluation activities. We believe evaluation is an important part of running a program – it allows you to reflect on and capture what worked well, what could be improved next time, and the impact your program is having on the students you serve. Identifying lessons learned and sharing them with HCF/other ABACUS grantees helps all of us to work toward a more equitable education system.

What is the ABACUS Community of Practice?

HCF hosts sessions up to four times annually to give organizations an opportunity to share information, make connections between their work, discuss challenges and identify systems-level gaps. School board partners are also invited to take part in the Community of Practice to facilitate connections between community programs and schools. Staff from ABACUS programs are expected to participate in the Community of Practice.


ABACUS+

ABACUS+

ABACUS, a collaborative initiative of Hamilton Community Foundation and The Fairmont Foundation, is a 10-year commitment to education. Its goal is to increase the likelihood that young people facing multiple barriers graduate high school and access postsecondary education, by focusing on the pivotal middle-school years.

Two new granting calls will close May 2, 2022 at 5:00 p.m. for programs that run in the 2022-23 school year. There will be an information session March 10, 2022 for organizations to learn more about the programs and applying to them.

Each of these calls reflects a refocusing of ABACUS to address particular needs uncovered through the Foundation’s research, experience and community consultation, including input from grantees. In particular, the refinements include an increased focus on the transition to high school, reading and numeracy in the earlier years, overall social and emotional wellness, and addressing the needs of students historically underserved in the education system.

Application guidelines: ABACUS+ (Guidelines for ABACUS Liftoff! program for students in Grades 4 and 5 are here.)

This call is for programs that support the overall development of children, focusing on social, emotional and academic learning. Programs must serve students in the middle-school years (Grades 6, 7 and 8) and/or those transitioning into secondary school (Grade 9 and the start of Grade 10).

ABACUS is based on the understanding that students and their families start thinking about life after high school early – during their middle-school years. Another critical period in a student’s academic journey is the transition into secondary school. Students are adapting to a new environment: a larger group of classmates, more teachers, and a semestered way of learning. Research shows that academic success in Grade 9 is a strong predictor of high school completion and post-secondary access.

HCF’s focus is on funding programs serving students who continue to be underserved in the education system. This includes Indigenous, Black and racialized students; Two-Spirit and LGBTQIA+ students; students who are first-generation attenders (i.e. whose parents did not attend post-secondary); and students who are: newcomers, male, have special education needs, have disabilities, have disciplinary records or who are from low-income families. HCF will prioritize programs that take an intersectional approach and are focused on the students’ overall development to meet their unique needs.

The ongoing evolution of ABACUS is integral to our broader education goal to strengthen the equity, wellness and academic achievement of Hamilton students.   

Grants up to a maximum of $65,000 annually are available; organizations may apply for up to two years of funding for their program. Grants are based on a school year and funding will be allocated prior to the September 2022 school year. Funding is also available to support program planning and evaluation costs, as well as year-round programming that aims to retain connections with students and bridge learning gaps over the summer.

Eligibility criteria

  • Organizations that are non-profit but that do not have charitable status may be eligible to apply under a fiscal sponsorship.  Information is available here:
  • Grants for one-time special events, individual student sponsorships, or capital will not be considered.
  • All initiatives must be carried out within Hamilton.
  • Grants will not be made to promote political, religious, moral or ethical philosophies or for purposes which may be deemed discriminatory.
  • Foundation funds are not intended to be used to fund programs that are the responsibility of the public through the annual Board of Education budget.

Proposal assessment

Applications will be assessed to ensure there is demonstrated capacity and credibility to plan, implement, and evaluate the work. Applicants must also demonstrate sound fiscal policies and a commitment to financial accountability. In addition, the following criteria will be used for assessment: 

  • Program works toward ABACUS’ goal “increasing the likelihood that students in their middle school years will graduate high school and access post-secondary opportunities”.
  • Serves student populations that are currently and historically underserved by the education system (i.e. Black and racialized students, first-generation students, Two-Spirit and LGBTQIA+, male students, newcomer students, Indigenous students, students with disabilities, students with disciplinary records, students from families with low socio-economic status, students with special education needs, students from rural and remote locations)
  • Program uses intersectional approach to meet student needs. This means considering multiple dimensions of a student’s identity and the systems they live in. For example, an intersectional literacy program in schools would incorporate different learning styles of students and culturally relevant examples that support students’ connection to material, as well as access points to the program that are tailored to the students (e.g. languages spoken by staff, transportation, food, physical accessibility etc.)
  • Program incorporates elements of successful early intervention programs that are supported by evidence i.e. tailored to meet student needs, makes a conscious effort to identify and address systemic barriers, incorporates the overall development of a student (social, emotional, mental, physical health and wellness) and is also connected to academic readiness and preparation for post-secondary opportunities.
  • Program demonstrates recognition that a trusted adult ally and a sense of belonging are central elements of a student’s ability to navigate the education system and plan for their educational future. For example, a drop-in after-school program has a consistent adult present, reliable hours and location, and welcomes youth regardless of how often they participate. The program staff also invites youth to participate in the development of the program’s governance, design and delivery. 
  • Program is able to demonstrate the impact of their program and has a plan for doing so.
  • Program demonstrates an alignment with HCF’s commitment to learning (i.e. ongoing program refinement based on lessons learned, sharing questions and approaches with other community-based organizations, engaging with HCF staff on what is and isn’t working)
  • Potential to leverage additional financial support
  • Clear and reasonable budget
  • Level of co-operation and collaboration with other groups that could contribute to improved project results with special attention to Boards of Education and schools
  • Evidence of community support for the initiative (e.g. email or letter of support, memorandum of understanding, partnership agreement etc.)

Successful applicants will be invited to become part of a Community of Practice and will be expected to participate in evaluation and information-sharing activities as requested by HCF.

For more information about ABACUS please visit:

https://hamiltoncommunityfoundation.ca/leadership/abacus-advancing-post-secondary-access/

To apply:

You are required to complete an online application form which can be accessed here as of 1:00 p.m. March 1, 2022.  Please note that the portal will close May 2, 2022 at 5:00 p.m.. Applications will not be accepted after that time.

For more information, please check our frequently asked questions page. If your question is not covered, please email us at grants@hamiltoncommunityfoundation.ca


New: ABACUS Liftoff!

New: ABACUS Liftoff!

ABACUS, a collaborative initiative of Hamilton Community Foundation and The Fairmont Foundation, is a 10-year commitment to education. Its goal is to increase the likelihood that young people facing multiple barriers graduate high school and access postsecondary education, by focusing on the pivotal middle-school years.

Two new granting calls will close May 2, 2022 at 5:00 p.m. for programs that run in the 2022-23 school year. There will be an information session March 10, 2022 for organizations to learn more about the programs and applying to them.

Each of these calls reflects a refocusing of ABACUS to address particular needs uncovered through the Foundation’s research, experience and community consultation, including input from grantees. In particular, the refinements include an increased focus on the transition to high school, reading and numeracy in the earlier years, overall social and emotional wellness, and addressing the needs of students historically underserved in the education system.

Application guidelines for ABACUS Liftoff! Grades 4 and 5 pilot (Guidelines for the ABACUS+ program for students in Grades 6-8 and transition through Grade 9 and into Grade 10 are here)

This call is for programs that support children in Grades 4 and 5 to address reading acquisition and numeracy.  It is our hope that by doing so, students will be better prepared to transition into the critical middle school years.

Every summer, children forget some of what they learned during the previous school year. But now, because of increased interruptions to their learning during the COVID-19 pandemic, experts are warning that students are struggling even more. Students who already face barriers to education (e.g. racialized students, newcomer students, first-generation students, students with disabilities) are facing increased barriers and are struggling the most.

Hamilton Community Foundation’s research, experience and learning gained through ABACUS has reaffirmed that student wellness is central to their academic achievement. The need to focus on students who are already underserved by the education system is equally important. Equity, wellness and academic achievement are three key ingredients to a student achieving their learning goals. A “whole child approach,” one that focuses on a student’s overall development – not just their academic achievement, but their mental, emotional, physical health —  is central, especially at a time like this.

Grants up to a maximum of $25,000 for one year will be available to support initiatives addressing reading acquisition and numeracy for students in Grades 4 and 5.

Eligibility criteria

  • Organizations that are non-profit but that do not have charitable status, may be eligible to apply under a fiscal sponsorship.  Information is available here
  • Grants for one-time special events, individual student sponsorships, or capital will not be considered.
  • All initiatives must be carried out within Hamilton.
  • Grants will not be made to promote political, religious, moral or ethical philosophies or for purposes which may be deemed discriminatory
  • Foundation funds are not intended to be used to fund programs that are the responsibility of the public through the annual Board of Education budget.

Proposal assessment

The following criteria will be used to assess all applications for support from ABACUS Liftoff!

Applications will be assessed to ensure there is demonstrated capacity and credibility to plan, implement, and evaluate the work. Applicants must also demonstrate sound fiscal policies and a commitment to financial accountability. In addition, the following criteria will be used for assessment:   

  • Program works toward ABACUS’ goal “increasing the likelihood that students in their middle school years will graduate high school and access post-secondary opportunities”.
  • Serve student populations that are currently and historically underserved by the education system (i.e. Black and racialized students; first-generation students; Two-Spirit and LGBTQIA+ students; male students; newcomer students; Indigenous students; students with disabilities; students with disciplinary records; students from families with low socio-economic status; students with special education needs; students from rural and remote locations)
  • Program uses an intersectional approach to meet student needs. This means considering multiple dimensions of a student’s identity and the systems they live in. For example, an intersectional literacy or numeracy program in schools would incorporate different learning styles of students, culturally relevant examples that support students’ connection to material, as well as access points to the program that are tailored to the students (e.g. languages spoken by staff, transportation, food, physical accessibility etc.)
  • Program incorporates elements of successful early intervention programs that are supported by literature, i.e. tailored to meet student needs; makes a conscious effort to identify and address systemic barriers; incorporates the overall development of a student (social, emotional, mental, physical health and wellness); and is also connected to academic readiness and preparation for post-secondary opportunities.
  • Program demonstrates recognition that a trusted adult ally and a sense of belonging are central elements of a student’s ability to navigate the education system and plan for their educational future. For example, a drop-in after-school program has low-staff turnover, reliable hours and location, and welcomes youth regardless of how often they participate.
  • Program is able to demonstrate the impact of their program and has a plan for doing so.
  • Program demonstrates an alignment with HCF’s commitment to learning in different ways (i.e. ongoing program refinement based on lessons learned; sharing questions and approaches with other community-based organizations; engaging with HCF staff on what is and isn’t working)
  • Potential to leverage additional financial support
  • Clear and reasonable budget
  • Level of co-operation and collaboration with other groups that could contribute to improved results in the project with special attention to Boards of Education and schools
  • Evidence of community support for the initiative (e.g. email or letter of support, memorandum of understanding, partnership agreement, etc.)
  • Potential model that could be replicated
  • Need for Hamilton Community Foundation funding

For more information on reading acquisition, numeracy and whole-child approach:

For more information about ABACUS please visit:

https://hamiltoncommunityfoundation.ca/leadership/abacus-advancing-post-secondary-access/

To apply:

You are required to complete an online application form which can be accessed here as of 1:00 p.m. March 1, 2022.  Please note that the portal will close on May 2, 2022 at 5:00 p.m.. Applications will not be accepted after that time.

For more information, please check our frequently asked questions page. If your question is not covered, please email us at grants@hamiltoncommunityfoundation.ca


Edith H. Turner granting round Fall 2021

Edith H. Turner granting round Fall 2021

The Edith H. Turner Fund supports evidence-informed programs and services designed to support children and youth, families, adults and seniors in Hamilton who are experiencing marginalization.

The following grants were awarded from the Edith H. Turner Fund in 2021:

OrganizationProject TitleProject DescriptionAmount
A Rocha Canada
 
Operation WildProvides accessible environmental education and nature experiences to individuals with disabilities to promote wellbeing, environmental stewardship, and social inclusion and connectedness.$13,680
ACORN Institute CanadaHamilton Civic Connections projectDevelops leadership and civic engagement skills across vulnerable neighborhoods in the city with focus on tenant rights.$25,000
Adult Basic Education AssociationEducational planning servicesProvides adults in our community with objective, goal-oriented educational planning services.$12,760
Afro-Canadian Caribbean AssociationCaring For Black Bodies and Mind – A Youth Resiliency programProvide engagement strategies for nurturing resiliency in Black children through a 12-month social and educational project focusing on a healthy body healthy mind.$20,000
Ancaster Community ServicesYouth engagement program – the NetAims to help young people (aged 13-18) connect, learn, and be engaged in their community in a safe and supported manner.$10,000
Art Gallery of HamiltonAGH Learn: in-class, artist led projectsProvides literacy based, arts-integrated, curriculum opportunities for students in Grades 1 and 9.$13,440
Big Brothers Big Sisters of Halton Hamilton
  
In-school mentoringSupports children at a Hamilton Wentworth elementary school as well as provides positive social interaction for the students in an “out of classroom” venue.


$15,000
Cancer Assistance ProgramDrive2DeliverProvides free home delivery of nutrition, incontinence supplies, food bags and home safety equipment.$20,000
City Kidz MinistryCityYouth leadership developmentDevelops important life skills such as resumé writing, networking and interviewing.$10,000
City of Hamilton
 
McQuesten Urban Farm / De Dwa Da Dehs Nye>s Aboriginal Health Centre (DAHAC) Healthy Living PartnershipIntegrates the McQuesten Urban Farm with DAHAC healthy living and health promotion programming .$25,000
Compass Community HealthHealth in the DiasporaSupports newcomer youth to increase their personal agency, overcome tragedy, develop coping skills, and set goals for themselves.$8,300
Culture for KidsAfter School Arts Program 2022Supports performing arts experiential learning for children and youth.$15,000
Dr. Bob Kemp HospiceCamp Keaton Hamilton 2022Supports Children’s Bereavement Program, for children, ages seven to 17, who have experienced the death of someone close to them.$5,000
Dundas Youth ChaplaincyRoutes Youth CentreSupports safe space for youth ages eight to 19 from low-income households.$10,000
Easter Seals OntarioEquipment funding programSupports purchasing essential mobility and accessibility equipment for children and youth with physical disabilities.$6,000
Elliott Heights Baptist Church

Larch Afterschool ProgramSupports healthy development of children academically by providing customized support and socially by helping children deal with everyday life issues.$20,000
Essential Aid & Family Services of Ontario Inc.Infant & toddler food bankProvides emergency formula, food and diapers to families with children under the age of four who are experiencing financial hardship.$25,000
Fit Active Beautiful FoundationFAB Girls 5K Challenge ProgramHelps girls living in lower income communities develop the skills and confidence needed to live an empowered life.  $7,500
Hamilton East Kiwanis Boys’ & Girls’ ClubRec in a BagSupports marginalized and at-risk seniors and adults who are unable to access recreational services because of technological limitations.$25,000*   *$6,078 from EHTF and $18,922 Mary Lauder Cassidy Fund
Hamilton Festival Theatre CompanyHFTC Artist Development: ALERT & SPARK 2021-22Assists aspiring and emerging theatre professionals navigate the unique challenges faced by artists who wish to make careers in Hamilton.$10,000
Hamilton Music CollectiveHamilton Music Collective summer campProvides youth with access to all aspects of music performance, creation and production in a safe collaborative way,$20,000
Hamilton Philharmonic OrchestraMusic education and appreciation for students, youth and seniorsProvides entertaining, educational and accessible music appreciation programs for students and seniors in the Greater Hamilton Area.$7,500
Learning Disabilities Association of Halton

Some Assembly Required (SOAR) transition skills programProvides online and in-person support for students with Learning Disabilities (LDs)in Grades 6 to 9 in as they begin preparing and adapting to the choices and challenges of high school as well as support for parents.$10,000
Liberty For YouthBright ChoicesHelps to keep youth in high school and helps youth become aware of their strengths, improve their learning skills, increase their knowledge of career opportunities and make a plan to graduate.$10,000
Living Rock MinistriesRock Resources: Life skill & work readiness programProvides supports and training to vulnerable youth through Work-to-Earn and Earn-while-you-Learn models.

$25,000
Métis Women’s CircleElders Teaching Traditional Plant Science -Grade 6 to 8Provides support for students to learn about the reciprocal relationship between the earth and living beings.$21,500*   *$1,500 EHTF and $20,000 from Hogarth Family Foundation Fund
Munar Learning  Center (Sponsorship by Empowerment Squared)Somali Community Youth
 
Somali Community Youth Academic Program
Afterschool support and Literacy and Numeracy
Provides support for 50 students to improve their literacy and numeracy skills and support with their homework and social lives.$25,000
Neighbour to Neighbour CentreEducation & Food Skills Programming:  Healthy Bodies and MindsPromotes health and encourages social connections by enhancing knowledge and skills in preparing nourishing food, reducing social isolation and celebrating diversity and culture and supporting physical, social and mental well-being$25,000
Neighbour to Neighbour CentreMiddle East outreachAssists newcomer households, and households with systemic barriers to settlement, to connect with services and programs that address income and health vulnerabilities.$17,000
Pathways to Education CanadaKeep Hamilton Students Connected to their EducationProvides youth living in North Hamilton with the resources and networks of support needed to graduate from high school and transition to post-secondary education, training, and employment.$14,600
Rafiki Hamilton (Sponsored by Hamilton Centre for Civic Inclusion)KUSOMA Literacy and Math program for children in the Black communitySupport Black francophone children outside of school to improve in math and literacy.$20,000
Relay EducationKids’ World of Energy – HamiltonSupports workshops that teach students about renewable energy systems.$8,060
Scientists in SchoolIncreasing access to stem education for marginalized children in hamiltonProvides 30 virtual hands-on classroom and community STEM enrichment workshops to children in low-income neighbourhoods.$9,000
Shakespearience Performing ArtsThe Shakespearience In Class ExperienceSupports students in Grades 3 to12 to develop character, confidence and communication skills.$3,000
St. Joseph’s Healthcare FoundationSt. Joe’s Youth Wellness Centre’s Youth Empowerment FundProvide clients with the opportunity to apply for critical financial support to help them achieve their recovery-related goals, whether they be related to education, employment, gender identity, artistic pursuits, or overall health and wellness.$8,000
Start2Finish CanadaHamilton R&R Club+Supports children from BIPOC/marginalized communities with physical activity, a trauma-informed Social Emotional Learning (SEL) curriculum, and literacy/reading support.$10,000
Strong Start Charitable Organization

Letters, Sounds and WordsProvides early literacy intervention for children ages five to seven, delivered in partnership with school boards across Ontario.$10,000
Student Open CirclesCommunity Volunteer Circles (CVC)Helps to increase the capacity of Hamilton social service agencies to deliver their programs by recruiting, training, and co-ordinating weekly teams of volunteers on behalf of the agencies.$11,600
Telling TalesEveryone Gets a Front Seat: telling tales’ live streamed author visits to local schools and EarlyOnsSupports the development of 30 live-streamed author visits broadcast to local classrooms and EarlyON family service centres.$12,525
Tetra Society of North AmericaTetra Hamilton Chapter – Devices Breaking BarriersMatches volunteers with Hamilton residents with a disability to design and construct a no-cost custom assistive device that alleviates a barrier. $6,272
The Baby DepotSupporting healthy and stable homes for 175 families in HamiltonProviding families in need with a year’s worth of clothing and essential baby items.$7,500
Wesley Urban Ministries

Seniors outreach programProvides services both in English and Arabic to a targeted population: vulnerable adults and seniors (55 years old and older), newly arrived refugees ages, and veterans.$15,000
YMCA of Hamilton/Burlington/BrantfordBeyond the Bell After-school ProgramProvides interactive after-school programming that instills positive social and emotional skills by addressing each child’s academic, social and behavioural needs while emphasizing literacy, numeracy, recreation, and nutrition.

$20,000
Youth and Philanthropy Initiative Canada
  
YPI Hamilton Community Partner 2022/23Provides programming that builds skill and
character, and develops a greater sense of community and connection with local people, issues, and services.
$25,000*     *includes $7,928 from Youth and Philanthropy Fund
YWCA HamiltonPeer to Peer Connections: peer support program expansion for women experiencing homelessnessSupports peer-led approach to foster meaningful connections and intervention for residents of Transitional Living Program.$18,150
Total grant amount$662,537

Field-of-Interest Call

Funding for this call will be through field-of-interest funds held by HCF. Field-of-interest funds are established by donors to support specific interest areas (e.g., the environment, children’s needs, the arts, etc.).

Hamilton Community Foundation invites applications for support in three areas: healthy child development, meeting basic needs, and community capacity building. Details are provided below; please note operating budget eligibility for each stream).

1. Healthy child development (for organizations with operating budgets less than $5 million)

This component will fund initiatives supporting healthy child development for children and youth.  Grants will range from $1,000 to $10,000 and will be for one year.   Focus areas are:

  • Learning enrichment/literacy
  • Mental health
  • Recreational activities including the arts

2. Meeting basic needs (for organizations with operating budgets less than $5 million)

This focus of funding is to support initiatives directed to relieving poverty for individuals and families experiencing marginalization (e.g., through food, transportation, shelter etc.). Maximum grant will be $5,000.  Please note that requests for gift cards are only funded when rt of a larger menu of services offered to recipients.

3. Community capacity building (for organizations with operating budgets less than $500,000)

HCF recognizes the important role played by informal support systems in meeting the needs of marginalized individuals and families in our community.  This focus area will provide grants up to $10,000 to those organizations to help them build their capacity to do this work.  Capacity building grants are only available to organizations serving equity deserving groups including: racialized communities, newcomers, people with disabilities, LGBTQIA+, and the Indigenous community.  Examples of eligible capacity building activities would include (but are not limited to): providing volunteer worker honorariums, board development activities, leadership development, incorporation costs related to achieving non-profit or charitable status.

Note: For purposes of this funding stream, capacity building is considered to be whatever is needed to bring a non-profit to the next level of operational, programmatic, financial, or organizational maturity, so it may more effectively and efficiently advance its mission. HCF is looking to fund continuous improvement strategies toward creating a sustainable and effective organization rather than one-time efforts to improve short-term effectiveness.

Available funding

Funding for this Call for Proposals, is made possible through HCF’s various field-of interest (FOI) funds.  FOI funds are established by donors to support a specific area of interest to them (e.g. the environment, children’s needs, the arts, etc.).

Eligibility

In alignment with the Foundation’s commitment to supporting equity, diversity and inclusion, special consideration will be given to organizations led by and serving equity-deserving groups[1]

  • HCF grants only to registered Canadian charities and other qualified donees as described in Section 110 of the Income Tax Act.  On occasion, not-for-profit organizations without charitable status may be sponsored by a registered charity under a fiscal sponsorship. More information on fiscal sponsorships is available at: https://www.hamiltoncommunityfoundation.ca/grants/charitable-sponsorship-rules/
  • Organization has an operating budget that is below the maximum defined for each stream.
  • Costs are not being covered by other grant sources
  • Workspace is in Hamilton and serves Hamilton residents

The following are NOT eligible for funding:

  • Applications from Individuals
  • Research
  • Major capital expenditures
  • Applications from Organizations whose primary focus is fundraising
  • Activities that promote political, religious, moral or ethical philosophies or which are for purposes which may be deemed discriminatory

 Application process

Please note, content in your Application and Requirement forms WILL NOT AUTOSAVE as you type. Please be sure click “SAVE” periodically so you don’t lose your work. We suggest you type your content in a Word document, then copy and paste it into the online form.

  • Grants will be made in accordance with the Canada Revenue Agency’s guidelines – please see our website at https://hamiltoncommunityfoundation.ca/grants/ to confirm your eligibility
  • Complete and submit your online application form by August 19, 2022
  • ALL applicants will be contacted regarding the success of their application within six to eight weeks of the application due date

Questions may be directed to: Sharon Charters, Grants Manager, 905-523-5600 Ext. 242, s.charters@hamiltoncommunityfoundation.ca

 

[1] HCF defines equity-seeking/deserving groups are as communities that who face significant collective challenges in participating in society. This marginalization could be created by attitudinal, historic, social and environmental barriers based on age, ethnicity, disability, economic status, gender, nationality, race, sexual orientation and transgender status, etc. Equity-seeking groups are those that who identify barriers to equal access, opportunities and resources due to disadvantage and discrimination, and who actively seek social justice and reparation.


Annual Report 2019-20

Four months ago, nobody could have imagined the magnitude or the speed at which our lives would change. The COVID-19 pandemic has affected virtually every aspect of our lives — even the content and delivery of our annual report is different this year as we look to meet stakeholder needs in new ways.

There is no doubt we will continue to face disruption for some time. So how do you keep advancing in tumultuous and uncharted seas? For the Foundation, our values — responsiveness, collaboration, inclusiveness, accountability, empowerment — are our compass.

At the onset of the crisis locally, HCF responded, establishing the Pandemic Response Fund and making 16 emergency grants within days of the lockdown. The fund works to assist vulnerable Hamiltonians now, sustain or expand critical services over the longer term and continue responding to emerging needs throughout Hamilton’s recovery and rebuilding.

Collaboration has underscored our community’s response, as teams, funders, government, corporations and many others have come together for the common good. We’re humbled by the number of donors — long-time and brand-new — who have stepped up to support our pandemic response. New and strengthened relationships and ways of working have been forged that will continue to benefit our community past the crisis.

Inclusiveness is not only an HCF value, it’s part of our mission and vision. Although the pandemic touches all of us, the fact is that we are not all in the same boat; some of us are on ocean liners and some of us barely have our heads above water. Reducing inequities will always be fundamental to our work, but especially now as we address the disproportionate effects of COVID-19.

Of course, none of our work would be possible if it weren’t for donors over six decades, who believed in us and in the foundation model, and the foresight of successive boards who prepared us to weather this monumental storm. We do not take that trust for granted; accountability to all of our partners and stakeholders remains a priority. On that note, we thank our retiring board members — Dr. Juliet Daniel, Dr. Bill Evans, Milé Komlen, and Marita Zaffiro — for their wise counsel, especially during these last critical months. We also say goodbye to Sheree Meredith, who has retired after many years of excellent leadership to our Philanthropic Services team.

While our five values are both interdependent and equal, it is perhaps empowerment that is our guiding beacon at this strange and unique time.

By increasing the capabilities and resilience of individuals, groups and organizations, we will strengthen our community.

Like all cities, Hamilton faces a long and winding journey to recovery. We will get there. And the Foundation will be there to support our city all along the way. In these uncertain times, count on this: we are here for Hamilton, now and forever.

We’d love to hear from you! Please take a minute to give us your feedback.

Contents

Community leadership

Bringing people together on issues that affect Hamiltonians is one way the Foundation works to serve its city.

Over the past year, Hamilton Community Foundation has worked towards its strategic goal of increasing the health and prosperity of individuals and neighbourhoods. This included ABACUS, the Foundation’s initiative to increase the likelihood of young Hamiltonians completing high school and going on to post-secondary, supporting school systems to address anti-bullying and our long-standing commitment to working with citizens to build neighbourhood vibrancy.

With the local onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in March, the Foundation quickly changed course to meet Hamilton’s immediate and urgent needs. While a number of our leadership initiatives are on pause, we encourage you to read about them and their intent; and to follow their progress in future, knowing that we will continue to listen and learn from our community, and to reshape our efforts as needed through Hamilton’s recovery.

Though such a sudden and profound shift in the needs of our community could not have been imagined, a key underpinning to HCF’s leadership work is responsiveness. Recognizing both the immediate and longer-term challenges COVID-19 would pose, HCF developed a pandemic relief strategy that both incorporated new areas of focus and shifted priorities within our ongoing leadership work.

Community leadership

Bringing people together on issues that affect Hamiltonians is one way the Foundation works to serve its city.

Over the past year, Hamilton Community Foundation has worked towards its strategic goal of increasing the health and prosperity of individuals and neighbourhoods. This included ABACUS, the Foundation’s initiative to increase the likelihood of young Hamiltonians completing high school and going on to post-secondary, supporting school systems to address anti-bullying and our long-standing commitment to working with citizens to build neighbourhood vibrancy.

With the local onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in March, the Foundation quickly changed course to meet Hamilton’s immediate and urgent needs. While a number of our leadership initiatives are on pause, we encourage you to read about them and their intent; and to follow their progress in future, knowing that we will continue to listen and learn from our community, and to reshape our efforts as needed through Hamilton’s recovery.

Though such a sudden and profound shift in the needs of our community could not have been imagined, a key underpinning to HCF’s leadership work is responsiveness. Recognizing both the immediate and longer-term challenges COVID-19 would pose, HCF developed a pandemic relief strategy that both incorporated new areas of focus and shifted priorities within our ongoing leadership work.

Funds and donors in 2019-20

People who give to Hamilton Community Foundation share the desire to make a difference for Hamilton, forever. Donations to HCF are pooled and invested; investment income is the primary source for making grants.

As a Foundation donor, you can create your own fund or give to an existing one. We are pleased to work with you and your professional advisor to find the approach that meets your goals and circumstances.

Amounts, when shown, reflect each fund’s balance. Amounts granted from these funds are identified in the Grants by Fund Type list.

  • Funds shown in bold were established in 2019-20
  • Funds marked with a cross (†) indicate that the donor has chosen not to disclose the fund balance
  • Funds marked with an asterisk (*) contribute a portion of their granting to the Community Fund

Community Fund

Giving to the Community Fund provides HCF with the greatest flexibility to respond to Hamilton’s needs. Donations of any amount are welcome. Donors whose accumulated endowed donations total $5,000 may choose to have a named fund within one of three Community Funds: Unrestricted, Arts and Environment.

  • Unrestricted: Addresses Hamilton’s highest charitable priorities
  • Arts endowment: Addresses needs and priorities in Hamilton’s arts sector
  • Environment endowment: Supports a range of initiatives and organizations working towards Hamilton’s environmental well-being

All donations to the Arts or Environment funds will be matched by the Foundation on a one-to-one basis up to $1 million. The following lists identify the individual named funds within each of the three sub-funds.

Donor-directed funds

  • Field-of-interest: Enable donors to support a specific interest area (e.g. the environment, children’s needs, the arts, etc.), with the Foundation selecting appropriate grant recipients each year
  • Donor-advised: Enable donors to recommend the charitable organizations or programs that will receive grants
  • Designated: Benefit specific charities named by the donor
  • Scholarships and bursary: Assist and encourage students, including those challenged by education costs
  • Agency: Established by charities to provide a permanent source of income
  • Administration: Support administering the Foundation’s community leadership, development, granting and communication programs
  • Funds in progress: Donors interested in working with HCF may choose to build their funds gradually
  • Flowthrough: The capital and income from these funds are distributed over time

Funds held on behalf of others

Other charities have placed these funds with HCF for long-term investment.

Burlington Community Foundation Fund74,566
Hamilton Public Library funds1,619,383

Life insurance policies

The Foundation owns and is beneficiary of life insurance policies donated by Judith McCulloch, Joan VanDuzer, Ronald J. Zabrok and three anonymous donors.

Total face value: $872,000

Estates and funds under trustee administration

At the time of publication, the Foundation had been notified of a charitable donation (subject in some cases to the life tenancies of others) in the following estates or trusts:

Gerda Erika Beretic, Betty Isabelle Bethune, Roger Gilles Brabant, Adam Hugh Clark, Joyce V. Clark, Margaret Hambly, John Dennis Holmes, Kathryn Elizabeth Jones, Barbara Isabel Malcolmson, Josephus Franciscus Maria Mensink, John William Pike, Mary Joan Bonner Renison, George K. Seliga, Julie Slowca, Dorothy Ann Smith, Maria Swarchuk, Vincent M. Wagar

Donors in 2019-20

We gratefully acknowledge the generosity of all our donors this year:

Grants and community leadership in 2019-20

Hamilton Community Foundation offers donors powerful and diverse opportunities to drive positive change. We are unique in that we enable donors to recommend grants to the widest possible range of charitable organizations and initiatives: arts and culture, health and human services, environment, recreation and education. The pie chart shows how our total 2019-20 granting is distributed by sector, and reflects Board-directed granting and the philanthropic interests of those who have established donor-advised and designated funds.

The lists below show our grants in two ways:

Grants by fund type

These lists show the total amounts granted from all funds at Hamilton Community Foundation, identified by fund type. It also shows our community leadership project supporters and spending. Funds marked with an asterisk (*) contribute to the Community Fund.

Total grants and community leadership spending

Total grants approved 11,099,227
Adjustments for deferred grants (169,549)
Total grants paid10,929,678
Total community leadership projects533,679
TOTAL GRANTS AND COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP11,463,357

Grants by recipient organization

These lists show the details of all grants to all organizations in 2019-20:

  • Grants marked with an asterisk (*) are those made from the Board-directed Community Fund or field-of-interest funds. All other grants are from donor-advised or designated funds and reflect the philanthropic interests of those who established the funds
  • Organizations identified in italics are charitable sponsors for the grant
  • Some grants are payable over multiple years

In addition to the grants below, the Foundation provided grants totalling:

  • $60,930 to 19 organizations/camps that provided 504 one-week camperships through the Hamilton Spectator Summer Camp Fund
  • $214,174 in scholarships and bursaries to 76 students, and an additional $239,399 to 21 academic institutions and organizations

Financial highlights

Overview

The 2019-20 year included record-breaking highlights, as well as previously unexperienced challenges resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak in the last quarter of the financial year. The continued support from our many donors resulted in total donations at $35.1 million, the second highest in HCF’s history including donations of property and private equity of $27.7 million. Grants and community leadership spending also reached a record high of $11.5 million. During the year, Burlington Foundation, launched by HCF in 1999, determined that it had reached the size and stage where it wished to manage its own investments rather than maintaining them in HCF’s pools. We congratulate them on their growth and more than 20 years of serving their city.

The investment markets to the end of January 2020 were very promising, with our portfolios recording returns at +10 percent for the first 10 months of the financial year. In direct contrast to strong donation levels and grants made, the global pandemic led to a significant market collapse in February and March resulting in an annual public market return of -8.4 percent, mitigated by our impact investments for a total return of -6.9 percent for our overall portfolio. Unlike previous financial crises, the pandemic has a direct impact not only on HCF’s investment return; it directly affects HCF’s core mission of creating a vibrant, inclusive and diverse Hamilton.

What we currently know from a financial and operational perspective:

  • As long-term investors, HCF’s investment and spending policies recognize that volatility is a reality of public market investing. Our spending policy determines the amount available to grant in any given year, and enables HCF to grant at a consistent level, with excess income in higher-return years used to support income shortfalls in lower-return years. In spite of the market uncertainty, HCF’s spending policy remains at four percent, as our Board approved maintaining grant spending in these critical times for the community.
  • Our reserves enable us to continue to grant and maintain operating capacity when the market is weak, and were at their policy maximum of $4.6 million at the end of this year. The Board approved an additional $500,000 draw from the reserve to support HCF’s Pandemic Response Fund.
  • HCF has continued its work to reallocate more assets from our public market portfolios into impact investments that a) align with our mission, b) provide the required investment returns, and c) provide opportunities not correlated with public markets. With little or no correlation to the public markets, they have acted as a buffer to market volatility.
  • HCF’s staff moved to working remotely effective March 16, 2020. Our staff are safe and remain productive working offsite, and have done a great job adjusting to this change at a time of significant community need and global uncertainty. Our Board and committees continue to work together via technology to respond to the considerable and changing needs of our community.
  • HCF has maintained robust scenario planning, which has served us well, in order to react to material market disruptions. We have also activated our cost-containment strategy pending having a clearer line of sight into the longer-term investment outlook. The “re-imagining” of our annual report is just one of these initiatives. With our Board, we will continue to manage the Foundation’s operations prudently while protecting our capacity to deliver on mission.
  • Before the end of March, the Foundation had established a Pandemic Response Fund, with $2.0 million from our unrestricted granting and reserves, and granted $305,000 to 16 organizations immediately addressing critical services to high-need, vulnerable people. More than $1.0 million has subsequently been contributed to this fund through the generosity of donors.
  • The Foundation is also participating in the Government of Canada’s Emergency Community Support Fund, designed to provide rapid response to support charities working with vulnerable populations affected by the COVID-19 crisis. This partnership is facilitated through Community Foundations of Canada. At the time of preparation of this report, HCF has received half of an approximate $1.2 million commitment.

Lastly, in this unpredictable time, we will continue to communicate with our stakeholders often to ensure you are aware of our work and status.

In keeping with our commitment to financial accountability and transparency, full audited financial statements are here. If you have any questions regarding our financial highlights, please contact Annette Aquin at a.aquin@hamiltoncommunityfoundation.ca or by phone at 905.523.5600 x 243. You may also access the HCF T3010 tax return information here.

Board of Directors, committees and staff 2019-20

We thank the following for their contributions this year.

Auditors
BDO Canada LLP

Bankers & Custodian
Bank of Montreal and BMO Private Banking

Investment Managers
Connor, Clark and Lunn Private Capital Ltd.
Jarislowsky Fraser Ltd.

Solicitors
Gowling WLG


Emergency Community Support Fund

Frequently Asked Questions

Round 2 opened on October 5 and runs until October 30, 2020

How much money is available through this fund? Is it possible to find out how much is available for our region?

The Emergency Community Support Fund (ESCF) is a $350 million investment made by the Government of Canada. It provides additional assistance to organizations serving vulnerable populations. The Government of Canada is flowing funds through national networks, including Community Foundations of Canada (CFC) and United Way Centraide Canada  Hamilton Community Foundation has approximately $450,000 to grant to ensure that our most vulnerable citizens are safe and healthy.

What are the size of the grants being administered by Hamilton Community Foundation?

Community Foundations of Canada indicated up to a maximum of $75,000 per request. However, Hamilton Community Foundation will be issuing grants up to a maximum of $50,000 locally per request to ensure we can meet the diversity of needs across our community. There is no minimum for requests.

Who is eligible to apply for the ESCF?

Organizations providing frontline services to vulnerable populations affected by COVID-19 are eligible to apply. Agencies must be a registered charity with an active charitable number. Any other community group or non-profit looking to apply must do so in partnership with a registered charity. That charity will be responsible for all compliance and reporting requirements.

If you are a non-profit and are not able to partner with a charitable organization you are encouraged to apply through The Canadian Red Cross who has a granting program for non-profits. To find out more about their program please visit redcross.ca/communityorganizations.

I am a national organization. Where do I apply?

If you are a national organization seeking funds to support your Hamilton-based services, please direct your application to Community Foundations of Canada or United Way Centraides. This will support both national and local organizations in serving the needs of their respective communities.

If we have received other federal and/or provincial or territorial COVID-19 related funding, can we still apply?

Yes, ECSF resources can enhance and expand your current COVID-19-funded community service so long you do not claim for the same expense twice. Please make sure you indicate additional sources of funding on your application.

May we apply to United Way Centraides, Community Foundations and Canadian Red Cross?

Yes, as long as you do not apply to more than one funder for the same program activities and related costs. United Way Centraides and Community Foundations Canada will be co-ordinating locally to ensure that funds have the best possible local reach in serving vulnerable populations.

If I applied for and/or received pandemic-related funding in the past from either HCF’s Pandemic Response Fund or the Emergency Community Response Fund, can I apply for ECSF II?

Yes. Qualified donees may apply more than once (and to different funders if they wish) for different projects. They cannot receive funding for the same project or same aspect of a project from two intermediaries or two granting rounds while their previous grant is still active. If you have expended your PRF grant, you may apply again for funding to extend/expand.

Will you pay for activities that meet the criteria that are already underway?

If activities or services are underway, you can apply for additional resources to expand and/or extend the delivery of service for a longer time (up to March 31, 2021). HCF is not funding retroactively.

If my agency is receiving the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy, are we still eligible to apply for funding?

Yes. ECSF funds cannot fund any expenses (including wages) already covered by another source, but can complement existing sources, including the wage subsidy.

How many funding requests can be made by one organization?

Applicant organizations may only submit ONE request per unique emergency program (duplicate or additional requests for the same program to multiple funders will not be accepted). Applicant organizations are not limited to a single request: additional applications for unique programs or emergency needs will be accepted provided each is for a different project.

How does an organization apply to the ESCF?

Applicants can apply either through Community Foundations of Canada’s national portal, or by downloading an application on the United Way’s website. It is up to qualified donees to decide where they wish to – and feel it’s most logical – to apply.
Though community foundations and local United Way Centraides have separate funding streams as a result of our respective agreements with the Government of Canada, we are working together. Grant applications to HCF and UWHH will be assessed by our respective teams, then co-ordinating efforts and sharing information about ECSF applications weekly.

How will decisions about the funding be made? How quickly can we anticipate a decision?

Applications will be reviewed after the October 30th, 2020 deadline by Hamilton Community Foundation in partnership with the UWHH. We will strive to notify applicants of the status of their request as soon as possible.

Where can we find more information?  Will assistance be provided in the application process?

Please refer to the following websites for further details:

Community Foundations of Canada

United Way

Canadian Red Cross


Pandemic Response Fund

This granting opportunity is now closed.

Pandemic Response Fund

Hamilton Community Foundation is issuing a Call for Proposals to assist charitable organizations from all sectors (i.e. arts, environment, recreation, health and human services, education) to continue delivering important services that deal with the unpredictable landscape created by the pandemic.

To date, HCF has provided grants in three phases:

  • Meeting basic needs
  • Stabilization
  • Recovery and rebuilding.

As the pandemic effects on Hamilton continue to evolve, we are broadening our Pandemic Response Fund call to include all three phases.

We invite applications addressing:

  • The needs both of organizations and those they serve
  • Gaps not fully covered by municipal, provincial or federal relief funding.

HCF is committed to working with other funding partners and community collaborators to move resources quickly and will work to prioritize needs to maximize the impact of this funding.

The Foundation applies an equity lens to our grant review processes. This means special attention will be given to organizations and/or communities disproportionally affected by the pandemic.

Eligible applicants

  • Applicants must be federally registered charities, qualified donees or non-profits with a fiscal sponsorship arrangement with a registered charity (additional information on fiscal sponsorships is available here)
  • All initiatives must be directly related to critical needs as result of the pandemic
  • All initiatives must be carried out in Hamilton
  • Grants will not be made for political purposes prohibited by Canada Revenue Agency for religious, moral or ethical philosophies and/or for purposes which may be deemed discriminatory

Eligible expenses
We will consider a range of expenses including program costs, capacity building, and/or operating costs.

Complete and submit the on-line grant application, with required attachments by 5pm Tuesday, April 6, 2021, 5 p.m.

Questions?
Please check out our FAQ here or email us at grants@hamiltoncommunityfoundation.ca


Community Arts Fund

There is no Community Arts Fund open call for proposals for the 2020-21 year. Future granting opportunities for arts-based organizations will be posted on our website and social media as they become available.

HCF provides grants for projects that benefit Hamiltonians and by law, grants only to registered Canadian charities and other qualified donees as described in Section 110 of the Income Tax Act.  On occasion, not-for-profit organizations without charitable status may be sponsored by a registered charity under a fiscal sponsorship.  More information on fiscal sponsorships can be found here.

The Community Arts Fund provides grants in three areas:

  1. Community arts projects

To support developing and creating a community arts project.  Art practiced at a community level creates a powerful sense of inclusion, understanding and the possibility of self-expression among participants. It can involve one or more art practices, such as music, dance, theatre, visual arts, and storytelling, but the collaborative involvement of professional artists with community members is a necessary component.   Community may be defined as either a geographic community, i.e. neighbourhood, or a community of attribute/interest, i.e. mental health consumers, ethno-specific group.  Please include a resume of the artist(s) involved.

  1. Indigenous arts projects

Projects that have the transmission of arts skills and knowledge as their primary focus.  Projects may be in any artistic discipline – visual, music, theatre, dance or story.  Projects must be initiated and directed by Indigenous-led organizations with Indigenous artists.  For the purposes of this program, the term “Indigenous artists” refers to a person with Indigenous descent or heritage and includes First Nations, Métis or Inuit arts practitioners.

  1. Arts access and outreach

To help ensure access to the arts and art programming for historically marginalized and underserved communities. Organizations who do not hold charitable status will need to partner with a charity for fiscal sponsorship, as described above. This category may include arts instruction, subsidizing the cost to attend arts performances and other strategies aimed at reducing or eliminating barriers to public engagement in the arts.    Please note that child/youth projects are not eligible in this category.

  • Examples of underserved communities include, but are not limited to, Indigenous peoples, official language minorities, LGBTQ2, immigrants, refugees, ethnically and/or racially diverse populations, persons living with disabilities or mental illness, the homeless, seniors, persons in conflict (or at risk of being in conflict) with the law, and persons living in low-income households.

Funding available:

The following expenses are NOT eligible for funding through the Community Arts Fund:

  • capital campaigns
  • grants to individuals
  • endowment requests or deficit reduction
  • political or religious activities
  • research
  • activities outside of Hamilton